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MEET TCM

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Get to know the people who work behind the scenes at the network!  Join TCM staffers as they share stories on how TCM is produced, discuss network programming and what’s coming up on the horizon.

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SO YOU THINK YOU KNOW MOVIES

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Film Forum's Bruce Goldstein returns as host of this popular trivia challenge designed for the true aficionado. Pre-registration is not required and you can join a team on the spot. The winning team will go home with some cool TCM-related prizes.  Teams must be a minimum of 2 people with a maximum of 8.

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WELCOME PARTY

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Join your fellow passholders as we kick off the 7th annual TCM Classic Film Festival. *Please refer to the back of your pass for entrance eligibility.

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ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN ( 1976 )

Essentials

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

The phrase “follow the money” entered the vocabulary 40 years ago when this taut political thriller premiered. The account of Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s investigation of the Watergate break-in was a new kind of newspaper picture: for the first time, the plot focused entirely on the mechanics of covering a story, including hours of just waiting. Thanks to some sharp performances, Alan J. Pakula’s direction and tight editing, the picture keeps audiences involved for over two hours. Producer and star Robert Redford first approached Woodward and Bernstein about filming their story when it was running in the Post, hoping to make a low-budget picture about their investigation. When it turned into a bestseller, the production budget grew and he had to star as Woodward to get Warner Bros. to back it. Then, he personally approached Dustin Hoffman to co-star as Bernstein. Although they couldn’t film in the Post’s offices, the production team spent $450,000 to duplicate them on two studio sound stages. The Post even contributed its trash to dress the set. The result was the year’s second highest-grossing film, which earned Oscars for its script, art direction, sound and Jason Robards’ supporting performance as editor Ben Bradlee. (d. Alan J. Pakula, 138m, Digital) Presented in a 40th anniversary screening in collaboration with Warner Bros. Classics

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DARK VICTORY ( 1939 )

Love and Loss

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Only Bette Davis could turn a failed Broadway play into a personal triumph. She had a lot of help, of course, from director Edmund Goulding and writer Casey Robinson. The original play about an heiress succumbing to a fatal brain tumor had flopped on Broadway with Tallulah Bankhead in the lead because audiences got tired of the star’s constant complaints about her health. Davis saw the story’s box-office potential and fought to get studio head Jack Warner to buy the rights for her. The Goulding came up with the idea of giving Davis’ character a faithful social secretary, beautifully played by Geraldine Fitzgerald. Robinson gave her the original lines complaining about Davis’ declining health, and audiences loved it. Art clearly imitated life during filming: Davis was going through a painful divorce at the time, which led to an affair with leading man George Brent. Her personal anguish fuels the character’s trials, resulting in some beautifully vulnerable moments from the acting powerhouse. At the same time, her affection for Brent informs their scenes together, making this the most potent of their 11 Warner Bros. team-ups. Her gamble on the film paid off when it became her biggest box-office hit to date and earned her a third Oscar nomination for Best Actress. She would later call Judith Traherne her favorite role. (d. Edmund Goulding, 104m, Digital)

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GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER ( 1967 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn co-starred for the ninth and final time in this romantic comedy focusing on race relations. They star as a couple whose liberal values are tested when their daughter (Hepburn’s niece Katharine Houghton) announces her engagement to a black doctor (Sidney Poitier). The film was a breakthrough in dealing positively with interracial romance and, with the success the same year of Poitier’s In the Heat of the Night and To Sir, with Love, proved that films dealing with racial issues could do well at the box office. In fact, GUESS WHO'S  COMING TO DINNER was Columbia Pictures’ top-grossing film up to that time. For the studio, the big gamble was Tracy’s declining health. He had not made a film since producer-director Stanley Kramer’s It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (1963) four years earlier. With no insurance company willing to cover him, Hepburn and Kramer put their salaries in escrow as collateral in case he died during production. With a lightened work schedule, he made it through but died 17 days after shooting his last scene, and Hepburn was never able to watch the completed film. (d. Stanley Kramer, 108m, Digital)  

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ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO ( 1964 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

The first U.S film to deal seriously with interracial marriage (made three years before GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER came out) was this independent treasure shot in Painesville, Ohio. Director Larry Peerce’s debut feature stars Barbara Barrie as a divorcee who falls in love with a black co-worker (Bernie Hamilton). The two marry, only to have her runaway ex-husband (Richard Mulligan) return and sue for custody of his daughter. Peerce, the son of operatic tenor Jan Peerce, creates scenes so realistic they almost feel like eavesdropping. And he hardly shied away from the racial question. When Barrie and Hamilton walk home from a date, they’re stopped by a police officer who assumes that she’s a prostitute since she’s out with a black man. At the time the film was made, interracial marriage was still illegal in 14 states and Hollywood considered racial issues box-office poison. Even after ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO competed successfully at the Cannes Film Festival, where Barrie was named best actress, Peerce couldn’t get it released in the U.S. Finally, an appearance on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, during which he showed a film clip, attracted the notice of Cinema V, an art-house distributor. This is a rare screening for a film that was far ahead of its time. (d. Larry Peerce, 83m, 35mm)

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LOS TALLOS AMARGOS ( 1956 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Film noir heads south of the border in this little-seen Argentine film about a reporter (Carlos Cores) caught up in fraud with a Hungarian expatriate (Vassili Lambrinos). Their bogus journalism correspondence school is soon making them rich, but Corres begins to question his partner’s motives and the future of the scam. Journalist Adolfo Jasca’s novel caught the attention of Fernando Ayala, one of Argentina’s leading directors, who then mined the world of post- Peronist Argentina to unearth all the elements of a classic film noir—paranoia, moral relativism and stark contrasts between light and shadow. In the latter area, he was helped greatly by the work of cinematographer Ricardo Younis, who had studied with Gregg Toland, the man who filmed Citizen Kane (1941). Although Los Tallos Amargos has been little seen outside of Argentina, his work was hailed by American Cinematographer, which called the film one of the best photographed of all time. Despite winning Black Condors, the Argentine Oscar, for Best Picture and Best Director, LOS TALLOS AMARGOS was considered a lost film until it turned up in private collection in 2014. The UCLA Film & Television Archive restored the film with funding from the Film Noir Foundation and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. (d. Fernando Ayala, 90m, 35mm)  

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A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN ( 1945 )

Coming of Age

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Elia Kazan made a spectacular film-directing debut with this adaptation of Betty Smith’s novel about an immigrant Irish family struggling to survive in early 20th-century New York City. Darryl F. Zanuck, then head of 20th Century-Fox, brought Kazan to Hollywood on the strength of his stage work directing such hits as The Skin of Our Teeth and One Touch of Venus, and worked closely on his transition to filmmaking. Zanuck even approved the construction of one of the studio’s biggest sets: a four-story tenement that allowed Kazan to move his cameras from floor to floor in a single take. Of course, with seasoned studio veterans like cinematographer Leon Shamroy and art director Lyle Wheeler on hand, all Kazan had to worry about was casting and directing the actors. That would turn out to be one of the film’s major successes. Kazan took a chance on James Dunn—a one-time star fallen on hard times because of alcoholism—to play the hard-drinking father of the Nolan family. He then teamed Dunn with 12-year-old Peggy Ann Garner, achieving such touching results that Dunn won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor and Garner won the Special Juvenile Oscar. The film’s box office success cemented Kazan’s future as a filmmaker. (d. Elia Kazan, 112m, Digital)

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BRIEF ENCOUNTER ( 1945 )

Love and Loss

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Director David Lean and writer Noël Coward made the ordinary romantic in this beloved British film. Shot as World War II was ending, it depicts the romance between a married doctor (Trevor Howard) and a middle-class wife and mother (Celia Johnson) who first meet when he removes a cinder from her eye. Through a series of clandestine encounters in train-station tearooms, they fall in love—all to the strains of Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto, which found a new popularity when the picture became a surprise hit. After the success of Lean’s adaptation of Coward’s comedy Blithe Spirit (1945), the playwright had suggested an expansion of his short play Still Life (a rare serious work from the comic genius). Lean insisted on casting less well-known actors and working on a small scale. Nobody expected such a modest film to be a hit with film audiences, and it performed poorly in early previews. Fortunately, the producers entered the picture in the Cannes Film Festival, where it won the Grand Prix. It went on to international acclaim, bringing Johnson the New York Film Critics Award for Best Actress and scoring three Oscar nominations (Best Actress, Best Director and Best Screenplay). (d. David Lean, 86m, Digital)

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THE GREAT GENRE “DEBATE” MEET-UP GENRE “DEBATE” MEET-UP

Library Bar at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelLibrary Bar

Everyone has a favorite genre or two—now’s your chance to discuss your favorites with fellow movie fans. Join two TCM Staffers as they share (and maybe debate) the genres they love best. Alumni and First-time attendees are welcome! Note: Special ribbons will be given out during this meet-up.

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THE FRESHMAN ( 1925 )

Special Presentations

Poolside at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelPoolside

A unique variation on the classic movie experience when Thomas Golubić creates a live DJ re-score for one of Harold Lloyd’s most popular silent comedies. Golubić is an acclaimed music supervisor, DJ and record producer whose SYNCHRONIZE re-score project has created new music mixes for such classic films as 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Taxi Driver (1976). Lloyd’s comedy didn’t just mine college football for laughs. It created the college football genre. As with all of his films, the story is strongly grounded in character: Lloyd stars as the title character, so eager to become popular he doesn’t realize he’s being made a fool of by everyone except the landlady’s daughter (Jobyna Ralston), who is falling for him. His efforts to get on the football team land him jobs as tackle dummy and water boy until the big game, when he has to stand in for an injured player, with sidesplitting results. The film’s best-remembered scene, however, doesn’t involve football. Hosting the big fall dance, Lloyd arrives in a hastily put together suit that gradually falls apart without his knowledge. THE FRESHMAN was Lloyd’s biggest hit and was so closely associated with his image that when he made his comeback film, The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947), director Preston Sturges incorporated footage from it. (d. Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor, 106m, Blu-ray) Presented in collaboration with the Harold Lloyd Trust