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THE ART OF THE FILM SCORE: CREATING MEMORIES IN THE MOVIES THE ART OF THE FILM SCORE

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Many of the most emotionally moving images from motion picture history are memorably interwoven with the musical scores or songs that accompany them. Join Oscar-winning composer Michael Giacchino (Up [2009], Star Trek Into Darkness [2013], Jurassic World [2015], Inside Out [2015], and Zootopia [2016]) as he explores the secrets, subtlety, strength, and craft required to balance the complex relationship of music, images and sound. Co-presented with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

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A CONVERSATION WITH GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA CONVERSATION WITH GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

The beautiful and multi-talented actress Gina Lollobrigida will discuss her extraordinary career in film and the visual arts during this hour-long conversation. A star for over 50 years, Lollobrigida gave unforgettable performances in such films as Beat the Devil (1953), Come September (1961) and Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1968, for which she earned a Golden Globe nomination as Best Actress). Today, she continues to be actively involved in a number of charities and, since her retirement from acting, has continued her internationally acclaimed work as a photographer and sculptor.

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OFFICIAL CLOSING NIGHT PARTY

Club TCM at The Hollywood Roosevelt

Join Ben TCM and your fellow passholders as we celebrate new friends, new memories and our shared love of classic movies. *Please refer to the back of your pass for entrance eligibility.

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M*A*S*H ( 1970 )

Festival Tributes

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

The Hollywood war film got a new look in this comedy set in a mobile hospital during the Korean War. Director Robert Altman and screenwriter Ring Lardner Jr. dealt with war as anarchy rather than as a heroic testing ground, with a focus on the pranks played by the military surgeons, whose ire is focused on anybody whose approach was too by-the-books. Adapted from the novel by Richard Hooker, Altman chose as his leading men Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould (in a Golden Globe nominated performance), both rising stars at the time, particularly with the counterculture crowd. Altman’s earlier studio films had been dogged by executives who didn’t understand his use of overlapping dialogue and zoom lenses and recut pictures like Countdown (1967). With M*A*S*H, however, he was left largely on his own. The film scored great reviews and $81.6 million in domestic grosses, making Altman a sought-after director and boosting the careers of Gould, Sutherland and other cast members like Sally Kellerman, Tom Skerritt and Robert Duvall. Lardner won the Oscar for Best Screenplay (with nominations for the film, Altman and Kellerman), while the picture was named the year’s best by the Golden Globes, BAFTA and the National Society of Film Critics. (d. Robert Altman, 110m, Digital) Presented in collaboration with Twentieth Century-Fox  

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THE LONGEST YARD ( 1974 )

Inspirational Sports Movies

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Burt Reynolds stars as a football player turned convict who agrees to create an inmate football team to play the guards in exchange for early parole—if he agrees to throw the game. Producer Albert S. Ruddy got the idea from a friend whose football career had been ended by an injury, then turned the story over to Tracy Keenan Wynn, who wrote the screenplay. He lucked out finding a director. After years of independent work, Robert Aldrich took a rare job as director-for-hire to bring his hard-hitting approach to filmmaking to the picture. He also brought along one of his favorite villains, Eddie Albert, to play the mean-spirited warden. Along with Reynolds, the cast includes other one-time pro football players, including Mike Henry, Ray Nitschke, Joe Kapp and Pervis Atkins. To keep the climactic game—which runs 47 minutes—convincing, Aldrich had most of the cast actually play the game. If a character had to score a point, Aldrich kept shooting plays until he really did score that point. The film was remade as Mean Machine (2001) with Vinnie Jones, and as The Longest Yard (2005), with Reynolds starring as the team’s coach opposite Adam Sandler. (d. Robert Aldrich, 121m, Digital) - We regret that due to unforeseen circumstances Burt Reynolds will no longer be in attendance as previously announced. 

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FAT CITY ( 1972 )

Inspirational Sports Movies

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

After a series of critical and commercial flops, director John Huston came back with a vengeance with this hyper realistic look at the world of small-time boxers. This adaptation of Leonard Gardner’s acclaimed first novel uses the stories of two sluggers— down-and-out Stacy Keach and up-and-comer Jeff Bridges—to motivate a tour of some of Stockton, California’s seedier gyms and flop houses. Huston brought his own fascination with underdogs and his youthful experience as a boxer to the film, creating a gritty, ultimately quite moving depiction of the sport’s lower echelons as a temporary refuge for men without hope. It’s given a special glow by Conrad L. Hall’s almost classical long shots as Kris Kristofferson’s “Help Me Make It Through the Night” echoes on the soundtrack. More than balancing the downbeat story is the work of the cast, which also includes Susan Tyrrell, in an Oscar-nominated performance as an alcoholic involved with Keach, Candy Clark, in her film debut as Bridges’ young wife, and Nicholas Colasanto, as a small-time manager. The latter’s late-night monologue in which he convinces himself Bridges is a major find is one of the film’s highlights. In an era when Hollywood was desperately chasing the youth audience, the 66-year-old Huston’s generosity of spirit and keen eye for detail helped make this a surprise hit. (d. John Huston, 100m, Digital) Presented in collaboration with Sony Pictures

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CINEMA PARADISO ( 1988 )

Coming of Age

TCL Chinese Theatre IMAX

Writer-director Giuseppe Tornatore intended this film to be a tribute to traditional movie theatres at a time when home video and cable were threatening to supplant the classic movie experience. Philippe Noiret stars as a small-town movie projectionist in Sicily who becomes surrogate father to a young boy named Salvatore raised by a war widow. Through the years, the child grows up to replace Noiret as projectionist, then, with his mentor’s urging, leaves to study filmmaking. In a framing story, the adult Salvatore (Jacques Perrin), now a filmmaker, returns home for Noiret’s funeral and reflects on living his childhood friend behind. The film is an extended love letter to the movies, filled with clips from the many films screened at the CINEMA PARADISO—everything from Charlie Chaplin to John Wayne to Hollywood musicals—and was even scored by Oscar winner Ennio Morricone. With its portrait of a child growing away from his beloved mentor, it’s also one of the great coming-of-age stories. After it flopped in Italy at its original length, Tornatore cut 22 minutes and scored an international hit, winning the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. Both the original cut and a longer director’s cut were issued in later years. (d. Giuseppe Tornatore, 155m, Digital)  

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KING OF KINGS ( 1961 )

Religious Films

Egyptian Theatre

Critical response to this biblical epic has changed so much since its initial release it sometimes seems there were two films released with the same cast and title. In l961, most critics derided Samuel Bronston’s international epic about Christ’s life, complaining about the depiction of Barabbas (Harry Guardino) as the world’s first Zionist revolutionary and the casting of Hollywood hunk Jeffrey Hunter as Jesus. Hollywood insiders even dubbed the film “I Was a Teenaged Jesus,” while clergy complained about the Barabbas subplot, and preview audiences objected so much to Hunter’s hairy chest the crucifixion scene had to be reshot. With director Nicholas Ray’s rise in reputation, however, the film has been reevaluated. Contemporary critics now praise his big action set pieces and more intimate scenes, including those depicting Jesus’ family relationships. Far from detracting from the Biblical tale, the subplots—expertly acted by Guardino, Rip Torn as Judas, Hurd Hatfield as Pontius Pilate, Ron Randell and Viveca Lindfors—now seem a powerful reflection of the film’s spiritual themes. One thing that has remained constant is the praise for Miklos Rozsa’s score. It was his first after he won the Oscar for Ben-Hur (1959) and helped establish him as the screen’s preeminent composer of epic scores. (d. Nicholas Ray, 168m, 35mm)

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CHILDREN OF A LESSER GOD ( 1986 )

Essentials

Egyptian Theatre

With this film, Marlee Matlin entered the record books as the youngest woman ever named Best Actress at the Academy Awards and the only deaf actor ever to win an Oscar. Her performance provides the perfect centerpiece for a film that gave many viewers their first real insight into the world of the deaf. Playwright Mark Medoff had based his award-winning play about the relationship between a deaf woman and an innovative teacher on the relationship between actress Phyllis Froehlich, who played the role on Broadway, and her husband. For the film version, producers conducted a six-month search before discovering Matlin playing a supporting role in a Chicago production of the play. She joined a powerhouse cast that included stage veteran Philip Bosco as the head of the school where Matlin works as a janitor, Piper Laurie as her estranged mother and William Hurt as the teacher. In her screen debut, Matlin delivers a layered, impassioned performance that propelled her to overnight stardom. Hurt, who was on a roll after Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985), helped her adjust to her first experience acting on film, and, since he had won Best Actor the year before, he even got to present Matlin with her Oscar. (d. Randa Haines, 119m, 35mm)

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THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING ( 1966 )

Essentials

Egyptian Theatre

The Cold War went from bad to mirth in this high-spirited political comedy from director Norman Jewison. Working from William Rose’s script, he created a hilarious juxtaposition of Russian sailors and small-town American eccentrics, with a diverse cast whose fully dimensional comic performances had critics comparing the film to Preston Sturges’ best work. Alan Arkin, in his first leading role, stars as a Russian officer sent to a remote island town when his sub comes aground in New England. His efforts to get the ship towed to sea threaten to trigger World War III as he takes vacationing playwright Carl Reiner and wife Eva Marie Saint hostage, and runs afoul of town sheriff Brian Keith. Jewison did location work in Northern California so he had to shoot the setting sun through a pink filter to create shots of the sun rising over New England. When the U.S. Navy refused to lend the production a submarine, the art department built one, with a motor capable of sailing the ship. Not only was the picture a major hit, but it also caught on in the Soviet Union, where audiences were moved to tears by the sympathetic depiction of the Russian sailors. (d. Norman Jewison, 126m, 35mm) Presented in collaboration with MGM/United Artists and Park Circus LLC

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NETWORK ( 1976 )

Essentials

Egyptian Theatre

Though filmed in the 1970s, this satire of the news media still feels relevant today. From the time that television was invented, it didn’t take long for entertainment executives to take over news programming and screeching prophets—who make the film’s Howard Beale seem almost calm by comparison—to dominate the airwaves. Director Sidney Lumet and screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky didn’t see the film as a satire; in their eyes, the tale of a network turning a mentally disturbed anchor (Peter Finch) into “the mad prophet of the airwaves” was a critique of contemporary society. Nevertheless, scenes of executives negotiating to do a reality show about a terrorist organization and plotting new ways of dealing with declining ratings are almost irresistibly comic. Lumet subtly moved from a dark, almost documentary-like color palette in the early scenes to more vivid colors as entertainment supersedes journalism. He also assembled a solid cast, teaming Hollywood veteran William Holden, in one of his best performances, with rising stars like Faye Dunaway and Robert Duvall and stage veterans like Beatrice Straight and Finch. Chayefsky won the Oscar along with Dunaway, Finch and Straight, making Network one of only two films (the other is 1951’s A Streetcar Named Desire) to capture three acting Oscars. (d. Sidney Lumet, 121m, 35mm)

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ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS ( 1955 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

The beauty of director Douglas Sirk’s films is that they operate on two levels. For 1950s audiences, they were crowd-pleasing melodramas that dealt with the domestic problems of female stars like Jane Wyman, Lana Turner and Lauren Bacall. For later critics, particularly after the publication of Sirk on Sirk in l971, they function as critiques of the middle-class culture to which they were originally marketed. After the success of Magnificent Obsession (1954), Universal Pictures reunited him with Wyman and Rock Hudson for this tale of an upper-crust widow who scandalizes her small town and grown children by falling for a younger, free-spirited gardener. Audiences swooned as the two met in secret to the music of Liszt and Brahms. Yet, the film also functions as a critique of American life, where family closeness means controlling women, small-town values become an excuse for mean-spirited gossip and material success means cutting oneself off from real life. Sirk was able to get away with subversive messages in his films because they made money and made Universal’s stars more popular. His work would inspire a new generation of filmmakers like Todd Haynes, who copied his visual lushness in films like Far From Heaven (2002) and Carol (2015) while bringing the social commentary closer to the surface. (d. Douglas Sirk, 89m, Digital)      

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THE KID ( 1921 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Charles Chaplin’s first feature as star, director, writer and producer celebrates its 95th anniversary with this North American premiere restoration. Chaplin drew on his own childhood dealing with welfare workers and poverty to create this heartwarming story of a tramp who adopts an abandoned child. The film was also therapy for him as he dealt with the death of his infant son. In an effort to escape his grief, he went to a vaudeville theatre where he saw the young Jackie Coogan perform. Inspired by the boy, he wrote the story that would make Coogan the silent screen’s biggest child star. The two play an inseparable team—the child breaks windows so the Tramp can repair them—until the makeshift family is threatened by both social workers out to institutionalize the young orphan and the return of Coogan’s mother (Edna Purviance). Making a feature on his own was a huge gamble for Chaplin, as was his inclusion of dramatic scenes in an otherwise comic film. Although pathos would become a staple in his oeuvre, it was still relatively new to his work at the time. Fortunately, audiences loved what he called “a picture with a smile—and perhaps, a tear.” It brought in $5 million on its initial release, eventually earning Chaplin an estimated $60 million and a reputation as one of the screen’s greatest artists. (d. Charles Chaplin, 68m, Digital)

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HORSE FEATHERS ( 1932 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

Critics have called The Marx Bros. fourth Paramount film the funniest football picture ever made. Its surrealistic finale, as the Marxes take on a rival team in an effort to save Huxley College, is a highlight, but that shouldn’t obscure the film’s other great gags, aimed at academia, Prohibition and just about anything else that comes up. Groucho stars as a newly named college president out to beat rival Darwin University with the help of son Zeppo and bumbling sidekicks Chico and Harpo. Along the way they tangle with “college widow” (slang for easy woman) Thelma Todd, pompous professors and the censors (two minutes of the film were lost forever to get a 1935 re-issue past the Production Code). The jokes were an amalgam of material from screenwriters Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby (who also wrote the songs) and S.J. Perelman, and material the comic team had refined on the road in vaudeville. In particular, the college setting gave them the chance to pull on their “Fun in Hi Skule” act, making HORSE FEATHERS their most outrageous film to that time.

(d. Norman Z. McLeod, 68m, Digital)

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SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON ( 1949 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

After being surprised by the depth of John Wayne’s acting in Howard Hawks’ Red River (1948), director John Ford gave him an even more ambitious role in the second film in his “Cavalry Trilogy,” all adapted from James Warner Bellah’s stories. Wayne stars as a cavalry officer on the verge of retirement who tries to stop a war with the Cheyenne and Arapaho in the days after Custer’s Last Stand, delivering a touching performance now considered among his best. When filming ended, Ford presented him with a cake that said, “You’re an actor now.” Years later, Wayne would call the part one of his favorites and state that he should have won his first Oscar nomination for this film rather than for Sands of Iwo Jima (1949). Ford surrounded Wayne with members of his unofficial stock company, including Ben Johnson, Victor McLaglen, Mildred Natwick, Harry Carey Jr. and George O’Brien. Cast and crew endured harsh conditions shooting in Ford’s favorite location: Monument Valley. For one shot, Ford insisted on keeping the cameras rolling as a thunderstorm approached. Cinematographer Winton C. Hoch argued unsuccessfully to pack up for the day and later filed a complaint with his union about the director’s disregard for safety. The shots helped him win an Oscar for his work. (d. John Ford, 103m, Digital)

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THE BAND WAGON ( 1953 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 1

After going behind the scenes of early Hollywood in Singin’ in the Rain (1952), producer Arthur Freed and screenwriters Betty Comden and Adolph Green turned to Broadway to create one of the most sophisticated “puttin’-on-a-show” musicals ever. They drew on real life to cast Fred Astaire—who was considering retiring at the time, as a faded song-and-dance star attempting a Broadway comeback. They even incorporated his problems dancing with co-star Cyd Charisse, who had to wear flats to work with him. For extra measure, Nanette Fabray and Oscar Levant play a writing team modeled on Comden and Green, and Jack Buchanan does a send-up of Broadway wunderkind Jose Ferrer. For their title, they went to one of Astaire’s earlier stage hits, The Bandwagon, but with a new story. The score came from the work of that show’s songwriting team, Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz, including such standards as “Dancing in the Dark” and “By Myself.” The team wrote the show-biz anthem “That’s Entertainment” for the film, and Vincente Minnelli directed it all with style and class, making it one of the screen’s best musicals. The capper is a witty take-off on Mickey Spillane, “The Girl Hunt Ballet,” with music by Schwartz and choreography by Michael Kidd. (d. Vincente Minnelli, 112m, Digital)        

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DOUBLE HARNESS ( 1933 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Ann Harding plays the screen’s most patrician gold digger in this sophisticated pre-Code comedy in which she stars as an heiress whose family’s declining fortunes inspire her to trick playboy William Powell into marriage. When he realizes it’s a loveless match, they agree to part, only for Harding to fall for her husband and set out to reform him. Like many films released before strict Production Code enforcement, the picture seems surprisingly adult, treating marriage as more of a financial than a romantic relationship, showing Harding seducing Powell before marriage, detailing their sexless marital life and leaving no doubts about his continuing liaisons with mistress Lillian Bond. Ann Harding, RKO’s first big female star, is in top form, displaying the grace, naturalness and charm that excited fans in the early 1930s. Double Harness has been one of her least seen films. It was one of six pictures given to former RKO head Merian C. Cooper to settle a lawsuit against the studio and after a few TV appearances, they languished in a film vault for years until TCM acquired the rights in 2006. The film’s print was missing the pre-marital sex scene, which was later found in the National Center for Cinematography in France. (d. John Cromwell, 69m, 35mm)

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LAW AND ORDER ( 1932 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

This little-seen film from Universal has been called one of the essential early 1930s Westerns because of its script by John Huston, acting from his father, Walter, and the surprisingly fluid direction of Edward L. Cahn. Adapted from W.R. Burnett’s Saint Johnson, the first serious novel about Wyatt Earp (albeit with a name change), the film depicts events later filmed in My Darling Clementine (1946) and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957). The elder Huston stars as “the killin’-est marshal in the West,” pressed into service as the marshal of Tombstone, Arizona, to take on a family of rustlers headed by Ralph Ince. John’s script gives the film a cynical tone that anticipates film noir, while Cahn and cinematographer Jackson Rose keep the story flowing with ahead-of their-time uses of crane, pan and deep-focus shots. Andy Devine has an early role as a murderer threatened with lynching, and if you look closely you’ll spot Walter Brennan (who played Old Man Clanton in My Darling Clementine) as an extra. The picture was remade as the serial Wild West Days (1937) and the feature LAW AND ORDER (1940), both with Johnny Mack Brown; the short Western Courage (1950) with Tex Williams; and LAW AND ORDER  (1953), with Ronald Reagan. (d. Edward L. Cahn, 75m, 35mm)

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A HOUSE DIVIDED ( 1931 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

In only his second talking film, director William Wyler proved himself a master of the new medium. Movies were certainly nothing new to him—he had been directing silent Westerns for Universal Pictures for six years—but, unlike so many other directors of the time, he refused to surrender to the tyranny of the microphone. He was one of the first to move the camera for a sound film, creating some wonderful tracking shots for this tale of a grizzled Pacific coast fisherman (Walter Huston) who weds a mail order bride (Helen Chandler) only to have her fall for his despised son (Kent Douglass, later known as Douglass Montgomery). Wyler also made creative use of sound in the climactic storm scene and an early sequence in which two young men leave their mother’s funeral only to stop at the sound of dirt hitting her coffin. The film is also a particular triumph for Huston, who gets to show off his range in a role that echoes his stage success in Eugene O’Neill’s Desire Under the Elms. He even got to work with his son John, who supplied additional dialogue for the film. Huston and Wyler would remain friends for years after. (d. William Wyler, 70m, 35mm)

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ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO ( 1964 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 4

The first U.S film to deal seriously with interracial marriage (made three years before GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER came out) was this independent treasure shot in Painesville, Ohio. Director Larry Peerce’s debut feature stars Barbara Barrie as a divorcee who falls in love with a black co-worker (Bernie Hamilton). The two marry, only to have her runaway ex-husband (Richard Mulligan) return and sue for custody of his daughter. Peerce, the son of operatic tenor Jan Peerce, creates scenes so realistic they almost feel like eavesdropping. And he hardly shied away from the racial question. When Barrie and Hamilton walk home from a date, they’re stopped by a police officer who assumes that she’s a prostitute since she’s out with a black man. At the time the film was made, interracial marriage was still illegal in 14 states and Hollywood considered racial issues box-office poison. Even after ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO competed successfully at the Cannes Film Festival, where Barrie was named best actress, Peerce couldn’t get it released in the U.S. Finally, an appearance on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, during which he showed a film clip, attracted the notice of Cinema V, an art-house distributor. This is a rare screening for a film that was far ahead of its time. (d. Larry Peerce, 83m, 35mm)

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BULLDOG DRUMMOND STRIKES BACK ( 1934 )

Special Presentations

Chinese Multiplex House 4

Ronald Colman returned to the role that made him a star with this semi-sequel to his 1929 Bulldog Drummond. It’s only partially a sequel as it was made at a different studio (Darryl F. Zanuck’s new 20th Century Pictures) with different production personnel. Although Herman C. McNeile, creator of the British soldier of fortune, had written a novel with the film’s title, the picture is actually an adaptation of a different work. In it, Drummond is back in England for his friend Algy’s wedding when he stumbles across a damsel in distress (Loretta Young) and a body that keeps going missing. The film is decidedly more light hearted than its predecessor, often poking fun at itself with self-aware dialogue and absurd plot twists (every time Colman tries to show something to Scotland Yard’s Captain Nielsen, be it a body or a witness, it goes missing). The film benefits from strong production values, with Richard Day’s art direction on the lavish side, cinematography by J. Peverell Marley and occasional music by Alfred Newman. It also has a great cast, with C. Aubrey Smith as Nielsen, Charles Butterworth as Algy, Una Merkel as his constantly disappointed bride and Warner Oland as the villain. Little wonder some fans consider it the best of all Bulldog Drummond movies. (d. Roy Del Ruth, 83m, 35mm)

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THE FALLEN IDOL ( 1948 )

Discoveries

Chinese Multiplex House 6

A master of subjective camera angles, director Carol Reed created an entire world from the viewpoint of a troubled child in this adaptation of Graham Greene’s short story “The Basement Room.” He did it so well that he won the New York Film Critics Award and an Oscar nomination for Best Director. Ralph Richardson stars as the butler at the French embassy in post-war London. He’s the only true friend of the ambassador’s son (Bobby Henrey), who worships him. Through a series of accidents and misunderstandings, the child first discovers the married butler’s romance with another embassy employee (Michele Morgan), and then mistakenly thinks the man has killed his wife. His untutored efforts to protect his hero threaten to ruin the man’s life. Reed discovered Henrey on the cover of a book about French immigrants resettling in London during the war. He thought the boy perfect for the part, but soon discovered he had very little acting experience. As a result, he carefully built the performance around Henrey’s own mannerisms and pieced together his performance in the cutting room. That he did so perfectly is attested to by the film’s power, greatly aided by Georges Perinal’s camera work, which turns the large, threatening embassy into another character in the film. (d. Carol Reed, 95m, Digital)  

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SHANGHAI EXPRESS ( 1932 )

Essentials

Chinese Multiplex House 6

When Marlene Dietrich proclaims “It took more than one man to change my name to Shanghai Lily,” you know you’re in the strange, exotic world of director Josef von Sternberg. The star and director’s fourth collaboration is often hailed as their best, with von Sternberg’s sense of style infusing everything from sets and costumes to cinematography and performances. Dietrich even claimed he supervised the chiaroscuro camera work, though it was Lee Garmes who won the film’s Best Cinematography Oscar. The story of one-time lovers, fallen woman Dietrich and military surgeon Clive Brook, reunited on an express train held hostage by bandits was inspired by an actual event in 1923 on the Beijing-Shanghai line. Screenwriter Jules Furthman kept the dialogue clipped at von Sternberg’s request to mirror the rhythms of train travel. Then von Sternberg filled the settings with exotic details—and over 1,000 extras. The result is a total package, an almost seamless blend of all of the cinematic elements to create a magical world that could only exist in the movies. Although cynics dubbed it “Grand Hotel on wheels,” the film won ecstatic reviews and became the top box-office picture of 1932, as well as the Dietrich-von Sternberg team’s biggest hit.

(d. Josef von Sternberg, 82m, Digital)

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OLD YELLER ( 1957 )

Animal Movies

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Children who grew up in the 1950s consider this classic dog story a rite of passage. In fact, many a baby boomer relationship has been forged by the question Bill Murray asks in Stripes (1981): “who cried at the film’s ending?” Texas writer Fred Gipson’s novel, inspired by stories of his grandfather’s favorite herding dog, told of a Texas family that takes in a stray who quickly becomes a valued member, and a savior, in dealing with life in the wilderness. Disney saw the film as a live-action answer to his animated classics Dumbo (1941) and Bambi (1942), which featured their own traumatizing scenes from animal life. He cast seasoned actress Dorothy McGuire as the family mother (the film’s key adult role), with his popular Davy Crockett star, Fess Parker, as the father. For the two sons, he gave Tommy Kirk and Kevin Corcoran their first bigscreen Disney roles. Both would spend years working for the studio. The real star, of course, was Old Yeller, played by Spike, a yellow Lab that animal trainer Frank Weatherwax bought for $3 from a Van Nuys animal shelter. When the film became a hit, 20th Century-Fox built their 1959 A Dog of Flanders around him. (d. Robert Stevenson, 83m, Digital)

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THE KEYS OF THE KINGDOM ( 1944 )

Religious Films

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Gregory Peck became a star and found his enduring image as one of Hollywood’s leading proponents of spiritual integrity when he donned a priest’s cassock for his second film. A.J. Cronin’s controversial bestseller had floated around Hollywood for three years while producers tried to find the perfect actor to portray the young priest whose dedication to the poor prevents him from rising within the church hierarchy. As the property passed from David O. Selznick to Nunnally Johnson and, finally, to Joseph L. Mankiewicz, actors such as Orson Welles, Spencer Tracy and even Gene Kelly were considered for the leading role. Finally, Mankiewicz settled on Peck, a recent arrival from Broadway whose contract was shared by 20th Century-Fox, which released the film, and Selznick. He provided the perfect embodiment of a man whose quiet faith unsettles church leaders so much they send him to China, where he prefers ministering to the poor to converting the wealthy. Alfred Hitchcock was a big fan of the novel and wanted to direct the film version, but with production delays, Mankiewicz ended up hiring John M. Stahl, an expert at capturing emotional subtexts in films like Imitation of Life (1934) and Leave Her to Heaven (1945). The result was a hit that brought Peck his first Oscar nomination. (d. John M. Stahl, 137m, Digital)

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A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN ( 1945 )

Coming of Age

Chinese Multiplex House 6

Elia Kazan made a spectacular film-directing debut with this adaptation of Betty Smith’s novel about an immigrant Irish family struggling to survive in early 20th-century New York City. Darryl F. Zanuck, then head of 20th Century-Fox, brought Kazan to Hollywood on the strength of his stage work directing such hits as The Skin of Our Teeth and One Touch of Venus, and worked closely on his transition to filmmaking. Zanuck even approved the construction of one of the studio’s biggest sets: a four-story tenement that allowed Kazan to move his cameras from floor to floor in a single take. Of course, with seasoned studio veterans like cinematographer Leon Shamroy and art director Lyle Wheeler on hand, all Kazan had to worry about was casting and directing the actors. That would turn out to be one of the film’s major successes. Kazan took a chance on James Dunn—a one-time star fallen on hard times because of alcoholism—to play the hard-drinking father of the Nolan family. He then teamed Dunn with 12-year-old Peggy Ann Garner, achieving such touching results that Dunn won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor and Garner won the Special Juvenile Oscar. The film’s box office success cemented Kazan’s future as a filmmaker. (d. Elia Kazan, 112m, Digital)

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ENTERTAINMENT MEMORABILIA EXHIBIT AND APPRAISALS FROM BONHAMS

Lobby at The Hollywood Roosevelt HotelLobby

The TCM Classic Film Festival is proud to partner once again with the world-renowned Bonhams auction house to provide expert appraisals of classic movie memorabilia for Festival goers. Come and watch as the experts at Bonhams help your fellow attendees learn more about their Silver Screen collectibles. Through these clinics, Bonhams’ experts have discovered many important items that have gone on to bring record prices at auction. Appraisal slots, with a two item maximum, are limited. Attendees interested in having their memorabilia appraised can get more information make an appraisal appointment by visiting http://bonhams.com/tcmff, by emailing appointments.us@bonhams.com or by calling (415) 503-3218. Note: Attendance to this appraisal event is open to the public. Standby walk up appraisals may be considered, time permitting.

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HOLIDAY IN SPAIN aka SCENT OF MYSTERY (1960) HOLIDAY IN SPAIN ( 1960 )

Special Presentations

ArcLight Cinemas’ Cinerama Dome

A special presentation of this mystery film features the return of Smell-O-Vision!

HOW TO GET TO THE CINERAMA DOME, 6360 SUNSET BLVD.:

ON FOOT: Walk east on Hollywood Blvd. from the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel one block. Then go south (right) on N. Highland Avenue for three blocks. Then turn east (left) on Sunset Blvd. and walk approxi- mately .6 of mile. The Cinerama Dome will be on your right. From the hotel, plan on approx. 25-30 min travel time by foot.

VIA METRO: Use the subway ($1.50 each way). Take the Red subway line at the Hollywood/Highland station, and head east one stop to the Hollywood/Vine station. Exit subway and go south on Vine Street for two blocks. Turn west (right) on Sunset Blvd. and walk 1.5 blocks. The Cinerama Dome will be on your right.

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LIVE FROM THE TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL: FAYE DUNAWAY

The Montalbán Theatre

Passholder exclusive event! Oscar, Golden Globe and Emmy Award winner Faye Dunaway will discuss her life and career in this two-hour interview at the Montalbán Theatre. Attendees are strongly encouraged to arrive early and should plan on staying the full two-hour program, due to the fact that this event will be taped to air on TCM. NOTE: Passholders under the age of 18 must be accompanied by guardian. HOW TO GET TO THE MONTALBÁN THEATRE, 1615 VINE ST.: ON FOOT: From the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, walk approximately one mile east on Hollywood Blvd. Then turn south (right) on Vine Street and walk approximately half a block. The Montalbán Theatre will be on your right. From the hotel, plan on approx. 25-30 mins. travel time by foot. VIA METRO: Use the subway ($1.75 each way). Take the Red subway line at the Hollywood/Highland station and go east one stop to the Hollywood/Vine station. Exit subway and go south on Vine Street for approximately half a block. The Montalbán Theatre will be on your right. From the hotel, plan on approx. 25-30 mins. travel time by foot.